How Do Trends Affect Your Restaurant’s Style?

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Tuesday, October 17, 2017

    Sometimes it seems as if each source of restaurant news reports the exact opposite of what another source promotes. How can you keep up with trends and give guests what they want while sticking with a budget? This dilemma challenges restaurateurs on a regular basis. Here are some changes you can plan for, that are likely to stick around for many years to come.


    Go for Less Formality

    It is time to tone things down. All forecasters agree that the trend towards a more casual atmosphere is unlikely to die down. For some, that might mean changing over the décor as well as making menu changes. Consider your restaurant dining sets. Are they formal, wooden affairs with velvet cushioning? It might be time to contact your restaurant supplier and see how you can lighten up your ambiance.

    This might also mean a change from a strict focus on fine dining to something more relaxed and welcoming. Open up a patio, repaint your walls, or add some themed art and you have a good start.


    More Room on the Table

    Although there is some debate over whether the trend towards small dishes is passing, the fact remains that others consider them hot items. They may be served as snacks, appetizers, or multi course meals. But no matter how they are presented, if your restaurant is stocked with small, café tables, you might want to get something a bit larger. With a larger surface, guests will be more inclined to order several dishes at once, upping your revenue.


    If kids are part of your intended audience and you are making changes to tables, consider making them more kid-friendly as well. Tuck crayons and paper in a small shelf under the table, look at some of the new table electronics that will entertain the kids while the parents eat, and invest in some kid friendly serving pieces.


    Local or Home Made

    With an increasing awareness of the carbon footprint involved in food prep, guests are much more interested in having local foods and products that you make in house. This fits in well with a more casual feel, especially if you focus on comfort foods with a healthier twist. You can expand upon that trend by taking those foods and adding an international flair.


    New Flavors and Experiences

    Pretty much everyone is interested in trying new flavors from around the world. Even kids menus are starting to reflect a broader spectrum of spices and menu items. Healthy and tasty is the trend for kids; healthy, super foods attract adults. Find new ways to present favorites, drop gluten-based grains for those which are gluten-free, and you will really do well.

    Your restaurant supplier can do more than just provide you with new tables or chairs. They can help you keep up with trends, redesign your look, recreate your menu, and put you in contact with local suppliers. This help will make your transition smoother and quicker.

    Sometimes it seems as if each source of restaurant news reports the exact opposite of what another source promotes. How can you keep up with trends and give guests what they want while sticking with a budget? This dilemma challenges restaurateurs on a regular basis. Here are some changes you can plan for, that are likely to stick around for many years to come.


    Go for Less Formality

    It is time to tone things down. All forecasters agree that the trend towards a more casual atmosphere is unlikely to die down. For some, that might mean changing over the décor as well as making menu changes. Consider your restaurant dining sets. Are they formal, wooden affairs with velvet cushioning? It might be time to contact your restaurant supplier and see how you can lighten up your ambiance.

    This might also mean a change from a strict focus on fine dining to something more relaxed and welcoming. Open up a patio, repaint your walls, or add some themed art and you have a good start.


    More Room on the Table

    Although there is some debate over whether the trend towards small dishes is passing, the fact remains that others consider them hot items. They may be served as snacks, appetizers, or multi course meals. But no matter how they are presented, if your restaurant is stocked with small, café tables, you might want to get something a bit larger. With a larger surface, guests will be more inclined to order several dishes at once, upping your revenue.


    If kids are part of your intended audience and you are making changes to tables, consider making them more kid-friendly as well. Tuck crayons and paper in a small shelf under the table, look at some of the new table electronics that will entertain the kids while the parents eat, and invest in some kid friendly serving pieces.


    Local or Home Made

    With an increasing awareness of the carbon footprint involved in food prep, guests are much more interested in having local foods and products that you make in house. This fits in well with a more casual feel, especially if you focus on comfort foods with a healthier twist. You can expand upon that trend by taking those foods and adding an international flair.


    New Flavors and Experiences

    Pretty much everyone is interested in trying new flavors from around the world. Even kids menus are starting to reflect a broader spectrum of spices and menu items. Healthy and tasty is the trend for kids; healthy, super foods attract adults. Find new ways to present favorites, drop gluten-based grains for those which are gluten-free, and you will really do well.

    Your restaurant supplier can do more than just provide you with new tables or chairs. They can help you keep up with trends, redesign your look, recreate your menu, and put you in contact with local suppliers. This help will make your transition smoother and quicker.


    Keeping Things Fresh and Relevant

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Monday, October 16, 2017

    Is there any way you can turn the simplest ingredients into something special and fun for the summer? For many venues, the transition from comforting, heavy winter fare to light, easy, warm weather courses is difficult.  It takes more than just putting out the outdoor restaurant furniture and a few umbrellas on the patio. Consider incorporating some of the following ideas on your menu.


    Lighten Up Your Beverages

    Sodas will always have their place on the drinks menu, as will iced tea and beer, but why not expand into juices? You can make your own juices with a new juicing machine, or blend them with clear sodas for extra pizzazz for your young guests.  Infuse water with organic tea blends, healthy ingredients, and herbs for something that appeals to the parents as well. Focus on summer flavors and lightly sweetened options and you have a winner every time.


    Reboot Dessert

    Take the opportunity summer presents to revamp your dessert menu. Popsicles are hot, or is it cold, this summer. Rather than hand out frighteningly colored neon confections, restaurants are making artisanal treats in-house. Summer fruits are an ideal base for such pops, and to add a bit more fun they can be served in a small glass of champagne.

    Fruits aren’t the only focus; foreign flavors are big too.  Thai iced tea, Vietnamese Coffee, and Tamarind are popular as well. Play with flavors and colors. Make layers or add surprising ingredients that are buried within the pop. Adults like the call back to their childhood while enjoying a sophisticated flavor.


    Offer Less Meat

    While Chicken is once again king in many restaurants, dropping meat from the menu is a popular and frequent summer trend. Meat-based meals are heavy and can slow you down; especially on a hot day. Switching to more salads, beans, grains, and fish offers the chance to attach to the local sourcing trend.  Grilled vegan and vegetarian options are also enjoying increased popularity during this season.


    Open Up the Patio

    Make your patio dog friendly. People enjoy getting out with their pets, but not every restaurant is ready to welcome them. Metal bistro chairs and tables are easy to rinse off with a hose, should the need arise. Water bowls for four-legged friends and some shade is all it takes to make the area inviting. Just check to make sure that local ordinances allow you to welcome guests of both species.


    Cider Up

    Not long ago you were lucky to find one or two hard apple ciders at the liquor store.  Today, this is a growing section. Easy to drink on a hot day, cider offers a fruitier experience than beer, and it is available in sweet, dry, and flavored varieties. Introduce your guests to this cool, refreshing drink and they will thank you for it.

    No matter where you are, summer time trends are easy and fresh. They take little effort to add to the dining experience and make for a memorable meal.


    3 Reasons to Buy Quality Restaurant Furniture

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Friday, October 13, 2017

    Restaurant dining sets can be purchased at just about any price point. You can spend a few dollars per unit when getting seating for restaurants or you can invest several hundred dollars on each chair. Somewhere in the middle you will find the place where most eateries reside: between cheap and exorbitant. Here are three good reasons to stick to quality over price.


    Savings

    When you buy cheap furniture, whether it is for your home or your restaurant, it just doesn’t last. You may pay less on the front end, but you end up having to replace things sooner; how soon will depend upon regular usage.

    Think about those white, plastic lawn chairs and compare them to something made of metal. Sure, the metal chairs might cost double, even triple what the plastic ones cost, but you will have them for years. Chances are good the plastic chair won’t last the season. In the end, you actually pay less over the life of the chair if you get a well-made, sturdy product right from the start.


    Customer Relations

    How does it affect your relationship with your guests when you purchase cheap furniture? Cheap furniture implies you don’t value them. It also has an unfortunate habit of breaking. Can you imagine how mortified a guest would be to break a chair while sitting down? Poorly made furniture is prone to falling apart, regardless of who uses it.

    There is also something to be said for offering a certain degree of comfort. Properly designed furniture has many little features that make it infinitely better: hand-rests, cushions, balance and more. No one wants to have to constantly reposition themselves on a chair to get comfortable.


    Style

    Few pieces of cheap furniture venture into the department of style. They are basic, mass produced and uninspired. Details are long gone. Wood is replaced with plastic, L-brackets with a couple of nails and padding with a thin sheet of vinyl. The image you present with is cut rate and unappealing. It may work in a cafeteria or a “hole-in-the-wall” food joint, but it won’t impress anyone.

    Style goes way beyond your walkway or entry area. It is heavily dependent upon you presenting a cohesive, fashion conscious “whole” to the guests. Quality furniture helps you to do that.


    Where Can You Find Good Restaurant Furniture?

    You won’t find real restaurant furniture at your local furniture warehouse. You should contact a restaurant supply house. The pieces you find here are designed for professional and regular use. Day in and day out they will hold up to the demands of your business, without losing their functionality and style.

    Take a look at catalogs first, but try to get a hands-on session with your selections as well. Mix and match chairs and tables until you create exactly the look you want in your restaurant. The time and money you invest now will more than pay off as the years go by.


    Trends in Restaurant Furniture Design

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Thursday, October 12, 2017

    Let’s face it, there doesn’t seem to be much you can do to stand out when it comes to picking restaurant furniture. That’s because so much of what you see will be standard, even run of the mill. It only answers the question of where you will serve people, not how you can serve them better. Here are a few new trends that seek to do more than get people in the seats.


    The Appeal of Colors

    Most restaurant furniture is made of wood or metal. Some even expands into the realm of plastic or glass, but little of it is anything but neutral in color. If you really want to wow people when they walk in the door, make sure to pick colored furniture. Keep in mind that just because it has color doesn’t mean it has to be resin or plastic; enamel can be any color when baked on metal tables, and wood can be stained to coordinate with other pieces.

    While not technically a color, white dining sets, bars or walls can be the perfect backdrop for colorful cuisine and brightly hued accents. Be selective in your use of color though, so you don’t overwhelm the guests.


    Function with Form

    One of the nicest “advances” in restaurant furniture is the addition of functional elements, beyond the seats. Women generally arrive with purses, and with nowhere to put them, problems are inevitable. Some furniture designers are now making restaurant dining furniture that addresses the need for safe space off the floor.

    Chairs are equipped with cubbyholes that are fluidly blended into the structure of the furniture. They may be part of the armrest, underneath the seat or structured as part of the back, rising above the diners. Regardless of where the storage has been placed, the essential problem is solved: purses are off the ground and out of the way.


    Eclectic is Good

    While it is unlikely that your local steakhouse will wander away from dark woods or booths, for restaurants that want to seem a bit trendier, then the eclectic look is in. Coffee houses are furnishing with a mix of couches and antique styled tables, while bistros are using a mix of wood and metal. Bars are getting into the scene by putting drinks in a variety of unusual containers. The unexpected is drawing crowds.


    Use Your Resources

    Perhaps your greatest ally in creating a new and dramatic space is your restaurant supplier. Your contact can do much more than help you get a new range; they can help you restructure your whole establishment. That means helping you get your hands on some of the newest furniture designs and letting you know just what trends are coming down the line.

    Keep in mind that the most successful restaurants reinvent themselves regularly, while remaining connected to their pasts. New furniture can be the perfect foil for a newly redesigned menu and an eye to the future.


    What’s Hot at the Café

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Wednesday, October 11, 2017

    Not every dining establishment features foie gras or fettuccine. In fact, cafés keep their focus on what’s in a cup, not what’s on a plate. As a result, they require a completely different approach to menu planning and physical set up.


    Setting the Scene

    For your café to draw in guests you need to pick a look. Starbucks has mastered the casual, dining room corner while providing lots of room for small groups to spread out on solid wooden tables. You can follow their pattern for success or branch out on your own. Perhaps some café tables and chairs with a French flair, or a patio set up in the style of a New Orleans hotspot, with bistro chairs and iron scrollwork tables?

    Just remember that no matter what kind of furniture you use, you need to pad it well. Comfort is the most attractive feature of any seating arrangement, and you want your guests to linger and indulge in refills.


    Trends in Coffee

    While several fast food restaurants have launched their own line of coffee drinks, independent coffee shops have been doing well too. The key is to do something different while maintaining the quality of your coffee.

    Pros in the industry are citing several big trends for 2013: customer experience, portability of product to the home, efficiency behind the counter and app-based services. Many are easy to incorporate into your business with a minimum of effort. Consider selling bags of your most popular coffees. Teach your employees how to move efficiently and quickly, especially during peak hours.


    Source your Coffee

    There is no industry that hasn’t been touched by the trend of naming where products come from and what they do for the world. Fair trade, organic, local or certified coffees are all the rage. Take the time to find out where your beans come from, who grows them and whether or not the pickers are paid a living wage. This kind of information appeals to guests.

    If you can find a local roaster to work with, use them. Not only does it touch on the interest in local production, it lets you have more input in your product, and often helps ensure consistency between batches.

    One thing to avoid in all this hand-on involvement: don’t give your coffees fancy names or long descriptions. Industry watchers agree that the trend of giving beans a whole biography actually turns off drinkers.


    A Final Trend to Tea Up

    Coffee house or café, tea is growing in popularity. Whether it is the perceived health benefits, the increased selection or the number of loose leaf teas available to the average consumer, tea drinking is in. Be prepared to get in on this opportunity.

    Tea pots come in many different styles: metal, glass and ceramic. Each is best suited for a particular style of tea drinking. If you really want to treat your guests, offer blooming tea flowers in glass pots; the experience is part art, part drink. You can also learn to mix your own unique blends.

    However you choose to honor your guests, be unique and people will find you quickly.


    Slowing Down is Making Waves in Dining

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Tuesday, October 10, 2017

    Not every opportunity to eat out needs to be quick and casual. Long a bastion of home based fare, the slow food movement is making its move to restaurants. Along with the inclination to relish meals is the accompanying move to new and unique flavors. Here are some of the hottest foods on the menu today.


    Ethnic Cuisines from New Places

    You may have moved away from the typical restaurant booth and clichéd chips and salsa, but if you haven’t expanded your menu to include authentic ingredients then you are wasting your time. Take the time to learn about the cuisine you are supposedly representing and don’t “dumb it down.” Make real food, carefully and you will attract those who are eager to taste new things and experience new pleasures.


    Plant a Garden

    Diners want local, and nothing is more local than the garden in your back yard. Don’t have enough space for a full garden? Fill window boxes with herbs and planters with edible flowers. Add them to your cuisine and watch how quickly they attract those localvores in your neighborhood.


    Go Small

    Amuse-bouche used to be the territory of fancy French restaurants. Today, you will find small appetizers served in tiny plates, in spoons or specially made plates that hold a bite or two of amazingly complex flavors. The same is true for dessert. Many restaurants are now offering tiny desserts or a flight of their best desserts. Health and weight conscious guests want the chance to slow down and taste many things, but don’t want full sized portions when they do so.


    New Side

    Pasta, potatoes and rice are out; especially if they are made from refined grains. Instead, offer unusual sides such as vegetables pickled in house, wheat berries, kamut, spelt or buckwheat. The more you do in the kitchen, even if it is time consuming, the more people will want it. If you must serve the old stand-bys, take the time to do something unusual with them; gnocchi from potatoes or hand roll those noodles.


    Go Healthy, For the Kids Too

    As any parent will tell you, it is a remarkably frustrating experience to take your child to a restaurant only to have them order the chicken nuggets and French fries they could have gotten at the local burger joint. Rather than order these in bulk from your supplier, make your own and bake them. No need for boxed mac and cheese; create a gourmet version that is still mild enough to make a child happy and use real ingredients instead.

    Kids are exposed to an endless variety of ethnic foods, just like their parents. Many like sushi, pho, curry and gelato. Help them to expand their palates by making their meals as interesting as anything you put in front of the adults; mom and dad will thank you for it.

    Keep in mind that if you are making the effort to present slow food you should plan for a more comfortable seating environment.  Seating for restaurants which encourage a bit of lingering must be selected carefully, so no one ends up with a numb bum at the end of the meal.


    Making the Most of Your Bar

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Monday, October 9, 2017

    Not every dining establishment is a restaurant, and not every bar is a place to wait while your table is getting ready. When your bar is either the main focus, or it is a primary attraction, keeping up with cocktail and bar trends is critical for success. Here are 5 things you should know for 2017.


    Bottled and Ready Mixed Drinks

    The trend towards bottled cocktails or single serves is growing quickly. Another option is running pre-made popular drinks through taps, not unlike beer. Quick, easy and consistent, such drinks save time and eliminate differences between drinks each time the bartender changes. Additionally, many of these drinks are being carbonated, increasing the “wow” factor for some. The biggest loser is drama: you miss out on the theatrics of a bartender preparing the drink from start to finish. Nevertheless, these drinks are incredibly popular.


    Changes in Glassware

    Forget your Manhattan glasses and high balls, put aside the mason jars and jelly jars, because glassware is evolving fast. Just about anything that can hold a drink is being used, and those vessels that offer a view are even more popular. Add to that the trend to create elaborate and appealing garnishes that fill the vessel and you have the perfect set up for art. Take the time to create garnishes that enhance the flavors in the drink and you have a winning combination.


    Craft Beer, Wine and Spirits

    It almost seems as if the smaller a distillery, brewery or winery is, the better. The explosion of local, craft producers has provided bars with a nearly endless selection of drinks. Whether you offer flights so people can taste several products at once, or you host tasting events, you have access to all those who want to be on the cutting edge.


    Pairings

    Sure, the primary focus of the bar is drinking, but offering a bit more than bar mix or pretzels boosts sales and helps guests pace themselves better. If you plan to serve a menu of small dishes or even full meals, you will need some bar tables and chairs in the area. Pub tables and chairs may be more appropriate if you are serving complete meals instead. Coordinate a flight of beers with German fare, wines from Spain and Italy with Mediterranean food and so forth. This is a great way to let both the bar and kitchen shine.


    Local Flavor

    Not only are craft products popular in bars, so are locally made products. While this can clearly extend to spirits, it also means getting your garnishes nearby, purchasing syrups and glassware in the community and investing in your local relationships. Being seen as an active participant in local races and events will help bring in new guests and keep your regulars happy.

    If you lack the necessary tools to jump on any of these bandwagons, talk to your regular restaurant supplier. They can get you what you need and probably make a few good suggestions on how to smoothly implement your changes.


    Changing Your Image: Perception is Key

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Friday, October 6, 2017

    Have you been doing the same thing over and over again at your restaurant? Have you started to see a drop off in sales as people look for a new experience? If you are suffering from a slump in sales, it might be time to look at what you can do to change your image while still retaining the affection of your regulars.


    How Trends Can be Used to Your Advantage

    It really doesn’t matter what your restaurant has become known for, there are always ways to incorporate trends. Current trends include using local food, adding gluten free options, offering small dishes and offering certified products. Let’s take a look at how each can be pulled in flawlessly, to give your place a new glow.


    Certified to be Popular

    Where can you make changes that address the new interest in certified goods? A coffee shop may bring in a new line of Fair Trade or Rainforest Friendly beans. A steakhouse can move to grass fed beef or add organic greens to their salads. A restaurant that is truly unable to make menu changes may opt to purchase restaurant dining furniture that is made from responsibly harvested woods or bamboo. No matter how you join the “certification” movement, make sure you blow your own horn and let your guests know about it.


    Local-vores Unite

    One of the biggest trends is that of customers demanding to know where their food comes from. This means they want to know where it was grown, how far it traveled to get to your restaurant and how it was raised. Using local craftspeople to make your restaurant furniture can go a long way to building good relations with your guests.

    Not only do you save money when you shop locally and develop a relationship with farmers in your community, you get first pick at the freshest and newest ingredients. To truly benefit from this trend, make sure to keep your menu flexible.


    Small Sizes, Big Profits

    Tapas are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the small dish movement. With all the press about Americans eating too much and restaurant portions being too big, you enjoy a double benefit if you offer a tasting menu that features petite portions.

    Offer your customers a mix and match menu where they can pick 2-3 options and get a few bites of each dish. Ideal for lunch or a light dinner, small plates lets everyone at a table try something new without committing to a full meal.


    Food Trend Consciousness

    While gluten free is the hottest trend right now, it isn’t hard to see how offering meals that avoid other common allergies would be equally attractive. Many adults avoid dairy, refined sugars or carbohydrates. Make an effort to accommodate such diners. For example offer dishes with two vegetable sides, or prepare desserts with honey instead of sugar. This will draw in health conscious guests.

    No matter how you move to change your public image, do so sincerely. Guests are quick to pick up when you are just making a show rather than committing to real change. 


    How Does Ambiance Affect Your Guest’s Experience?

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Thursday, October 5, 2017

    When you walk into a restaurant, how much of your expectations are determined by what you see? You anticipate a specific décor when you enter your favorite fast food joint. When you enter an eatery that has dim lighting and small dining tables, your inner voice tells you that you are in a “romantic” establishment. Ambiance helps you to form conclusions about the type of meal you will have and the atmosphere it will be served in.

    That said, it is important to plan the kind of dining experience you want your guests to have. Establishing a particular feel starts with making sure that you have the right restaurant dining sets in place. A good source of information is your favorite restaurant furnishings supplier; they can help you create the proper setting.


    Set the Mood with Lighting

    One of the most critical aspects in creating an experience is picking the right lighting. Hand blown lamps are suitable for casual or fun establishments. Crystal chandeliers are the perfect accessory for a large or formal dining room. Candles, muted lights and sconces fit well in a romantic and elegant restaurant. Consider installing dimmer switches, no matter what kind of lighting you have; they allow you to set the exact light level you want.


    The Right Color Scheme

    When you look at fun, family friendly restaurants you will notice that they are light in color. They may be accented with bright pops of neon, pale woods and eye catching Formica. This all helps create a space where people eat quickly and depart.

    When your goal is to create a formal and intimate space then you will opt for muted shades, dark woods and more solid, heavy furniture. This kind of setting encourages the diners to stay longer and engage in long conversations. Use color to foster the ambiance you seek in your restaurant.


    Create a Well-Matched Menu

    It may seem silly, but something as simple as how you describe your menu items can dramatically affect the ambiance. A hamburger can be fun and kid friendly or serious and gourmet. The differences between the two lies in what you put on the meat and how you present it. Focus on the details of presentation and you can completely change a guest’s perception of their meal.


    Trends in the Industry

    Because consumers are being more careful with spending their disposable income, there has been a visible trend in restaurants becoming more upscale. A perfect example is the coffee shop now featured at many McDonald’s restaurants. Many restaurants provide free access to WiFi, and even fast food places are seeking to move themselves into the “casual” category.

    For franchises this kind of transition is much more challenging than it is for the independent owner. Having a free hand allows you to make quick changes without waiting for approval. No matter what your goals are when redesigning your restaurant’s ambiance, start with a basic plan and then look into what is necessary to make your dream a reality. It will all come together in the end.


    Trending Materials in Restaurant Furniture

    Published By: Leon Tuberman  -  Wednesday, October 4, 2017

    It takes more than good food to make a restaurant shine. Everything, from the parking lot to the window coverings, needs to be just right. You may be tempted to pick up the cheapest restaurant furniture you can, but in this case, you must be pound wise, not penny foolish. That doesn’t mean you have to set aside most of your start up budget or renovation funds for furniture; it means you have to think about what you are going to put in your restaurant, and shop accordingly.

    Let’s take a look at your material choices, and why each is advantageous or not:


    Wooden Furniture

    Wood offers warmth, especially in dark tones. Wooden furniture comes in all sizes and shapes. It can be plain and contemporary or intricately carved and reflect a more traditional feel. Wood is often chosen for tables as well as chairs, creating a cohesive look throughout your restaurant. Easy to paint or stain, wood can be adapted to most environments, but is unsuitable outside.

    If you have any sort of precipitation, wood may rot when outside. Even if it doesn’t rot, it will suffer damage from the moisture, causing a mottled and unappealing look.


    Metal Décor

    Metal furniture can be very artistic, and iron pieces work well out doors. Heavy enough not to be blown over by all but the strongest winds, metal furniture can last forever if it is regularly painted and maintained. This makes metal furniture ideal for a patio or deck.

    Inside it can be a bit loud when moved around, and the weight is an encumbrance rather than an advantage. Furthermore, without proper padding, metal furniture chairs can quickly become uncomfortable. If you want to use metal inside your restaurant then aluminum tables are a good options. They are easy to clean and withstand tremendous abuse without flinching.


    Plastic Choices

    You can find several different styles of plastic furniture for your restaurant, but it is only suited for lower end eateries. Usually the least expensive option when it comes to setting up shop, plastic is easily replaced when broken and it might even be recyclable.

    Plastic won’t rot or rust, but many types of plastic furniture don’t withstand regular use. The most obvious problem with plastic is that is isn’t very aesthetically pleasing. If you are trying to attract a better class of diner, skip plastic and invest in something better.


    Other Options

    Glass and stone are also options for table tops. Laminates made of wood, Formica and other materials are also available. You can mix and match, for an eclectic look, or pick one type of seating for restaurants inside and another outside. Also, consider the practicality of a restaurant booth here and there if your cuisine encourages a homey atmosphere.

    No matter what you choose, only invest in restaurant quality sets. No residential furniture can stand up to the kind of use and abuse that restaurant dining sets encounter. Day in, day out your furniture has to withstand all sorts of customers, it needs to be easy to move for cleaning and it will be wiped non-stop. Buy quality the first time and you won’t have to constantly re-invest.



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